Holistic Health

What Are Medical Marijuana and Cannabidiol (CBD)? Everything You Need to Know

The cannabis plant, from which marijuana is derived, is often smoked for recreational purposes. But people are increasingly using marijuana to treat medical conditions — and this medical marijuana is not always smoked. It comes in many forms:

  • Marijuana cigarettes containing the cannabinoids (chemical compounds) tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or cannabidiol (CBD), or both THC and CBD
  • CBD oils, edibles, tinctures, creams, and capsules
  • Cannabis-derived pharmaceutical products approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

Studies suggest that the medical use of marijuana may help treat the following conditions or help alleviate the following symptoms: (1)

Some research has suggested that the cannabinoids in marijuana could also be useful in managing these conditions:

According to a 2017 report from the National Academies of the Sciences, Medicine, and Engineering (NASME), the strongest scientific evidence so far has been found in support of using marijuana for chronic pain, cancer-related nausea and vomiting, and MS-related spasticity. (1)

This NASME report, one of the largest of its kind, looked at more than 10,000 studies published since 1999.

How Does Marijuana Affect the Body?

It depends on whether THC or CBD is the cannabinoid at work. They produce similar effects, but there are differences in intensity because they each affect a different neural pathway.

THC is thought to engage with the body’s endocannabinoid system, which helps regulate physiological functioning. THC is similar to a chemical that’s present in this system, and when these two chemicals meet, the similarity allows THC to exert an influence on the body and brain in ways that alter coordination, memory, decision-making, appetite, and mood.

The endocannabinoid system also helps regulate gastrointestinal functions, and this may explain why medical marijuana seems to help digestive disorders like IBS.

CBD, scientists think, affects the brain because of the way it interacts with the neurological pathways that regulate serotonin, the hormone that regulates anxiety, pain, nausea, and appetite.

Source: Everyday Health

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